Wave 4: late May, 2 months into lockdown

In Wave 4, in late May, 2 months in the lockdown we found that:

  • In general, while the extent of coping well is improving among the population as a whole, it appears that certain groups are at greater risk of experiencing poor, and in some cases, deteriorating mental health.
  • In general, the trend of the proportion of people reporting being anxious in the last two weeks as a result of the coronavirus pandemic is downwards since the first survey carried out in mid-March, having fallen from 62% to 53%.
  • A higher proportion of people with long-term health conditions (62%), single parents (59%), young people age 25-34 (63%), and women (62%) reported having been anxious/worried compared to the overall adult population.
  • Higher proportions of young people age 18-24 (47%) and single parents (44%) report having been lonely in the previous two weeks than the adult population overall (26%).
  • Higher proportions of young people aged 18-24 (30%), adults aged 25-34 (28%), and single parents (30%) report being hopeless in the previous two weeks than the overall adult population (18%).
  • In general, the proportion of people reporting having panicked in the previous two weeks has gone down since the first survey carried out in mid-March, from 22% to 13%.
    • But the trend is upward for the proportion of unemployed people that have panicked in the previous two weeks (from 18% in early April to 24% in late May).
  • In general, the proportion of people reporting financial concerns as a result of the pandemic has decreased from 42% in mid-March to 29% at the end of May.
    • However, the trend is upward for unemployed people (from 47% in early April to 56% in late May).
    • The proportion of people reporting financial concerns was much higher for unemployed (56%), single parents (45%), parents of children age 5-11 (40%), parents of children age 12-16 (40%) and young people age 25-34 (41%) than for the overall adult population (29%).
  • A higher proportion of people with long-term health conditions (30%), single parents (26%), and unemployed people (26%) are not coping well compared to the population overall (14%).