COVID-19 Scotland Wave 5: Key Findings

In Wave 5 in late June, nearly 3 months into lockdown along with lifting restrictions on the public, we found that in general, the proportion of people reporting negative emotions has started to decline:

  • Scottish adults reporting having felt anxious or worried has dropped to 49% by late June. This was 64% in mid-March before lockdown and down to 54% in late May
  • The proportion of people reporting feeling afraid and panicked has also shown a downward trend since early April. 20% (down from 34% in early April) reported being afraid and 12% (down from 19% in early April) reported being panicked

In addition, downward or flat trends have been shown across the proportion of people reporting concerns and stress related to the pandemic:

  • The proportion of Scottish people worried about passing the Coronavirus on to someone else has fallen to 60%. This was 81% before lockdown and down to 65% in late May.
  • Fewer people have reported concerns about being separated from friends and family (54%, down from 63% in late May), becoming ill with the Coronavirus (48%, down from 55% in late May), and coping with uncertainty (44%, down from 48% in late May).
  • 43% of parents have worried about the mental health of their child(ren) would be affected by the pandemic, this has dropped slightly from 46% in late May.

However, the proportion of Scottish adults reporting that they are coping well with the stress of the pandemic has dropped slightly from 72% in late May to 68%, with the proportion of not coping well up to 15%.

  • A higher proportion of people with pre-existing mental health condition (33%), a long-term health condition (29%), single parents (28%), and unemployed people (28%) are not coping well compared to all Scottish adults (15%).

* Question not asked in Wave 1. Single Parents, Pre-existing Mental Health Condition & Long-Term Conditions not segmented prior to Wave 4

Among vulnerable and inequality groups, the proportion of people reporting negative emotions and stress were higher as they may be facing greater risk of experiencing financial concerns and negative thoughts and feelings:

  • A higher proportion of single parents (45%), full-time students (45%), and people with pre-existing mental health condition (40%) reported loneliness compared to all Sottish adults (25%).
  • People with pre-existing mental health condition reported more negative emotions including anxious or worried (68%, higher than 49% among all Scottish adults) and hopeless (26%, higher than 16% among all Scottish adults).
  • Two-thirds of people (66%) with pre-existing mental health conditions were worried in the past two weeks that their mental health problems may get worse because of the pandemic.
  • A higher proportion of full-time students (65%), young adults aged between 18 to 24 years old (63%), and people with pre-existing mental health condition (62%) reported concerns about being separated from friends and family compared to all Scottish adults (54%).
  • A higher proportion of unemployed people (51%) and people with pre-existing mental health condition (49%) reported financial concerns compared to all Scottish adults (31%).
  • A higher proportion of people with pre-existing mental health condition (29%), single parents (26%), and unemployed people (20%) have experienced suicidal thoughts or feelings over the previous 2 weeks compared to all Scottish adults (11%).

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 2,004 Scottish adults 18+. Fieldwork was undertaken between 18th – 26th June 2020.  The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+).